"Hello there. The following is an incomplete list of Domestic Violence shelters for Queer and Trans* People of Color in all 50 United States. This list will also contain reading resources with tools for addressing abuse and domestic violence in queer communities."

March of Tigers - QPoC Domestic Violence Resources and Literature

Signal boosting this project that March of Tigers is leading. I won’t reblog the whole list because (luckily) it’s huge but do click through the link and check it out. Also, support March of Tigers by either further helping spread awareness of this resource or by contributing with further data.

(via redlightpolitics)

"Developing the ability to piss other people off (or even to RISK pissing them off) without knuckling under is pretty much the Holy Grail of emotionally abused kids, I think. We are programmed to respond at the first sign of displeasure, and we don’t have the faith in ourselves and our decisions to weather the storm– or even a mild sprinkle– so we tend to freak out as if the world was ending if a cloud crosses the sun. We freak out about the possibility that we’re wrong, that we’re doing the wrong things, that we’re making the wrong choices, that we’ll make someone angry, because there’s this awful certainty lurking at the back of our minds that says “If you do the wrong thing, you will be in TROUBLE.” And being in TROUBLE is the worst thing, ever, because that part of our brain is forever three years old where our parents are our whole world and being in TROUBLE is the end of everything.

It takes a lot of practice to gain that sort of gut-level knowledge that we’re strong enough to handle this stuff and that the world doesn’t end if someone else is angry at us. It’s not an innate quality that some people have and some don’t; people who grow up in non-abusive homes learn it when they’re young, is all, and the rest of us have to learn it when we’re grown up. And it sucks, and it’s not fair, and it’s not fun, but there’s no getting around it, and you can do it, you CAN.

You can piss people off.

You can be wrong.

You can fuck up.

You can do stuff that everyone thinks is weird.

AND IT IS ALL OKAY. The world won’t end. You will still be a good person. And the likelihood is that most of the things you do WON’T be wrong, and WON’T piss people off, and WON’T be up-fuckery, and WON’T be weird, but if it is? The hell with it; fix it, if necessary, and move on."

PomperaFirpa @Captain Awkward (via ladysaviours)

(Source: ladysaviours, via disabledbyculture)

"Some activists are interested in Community Accountability processes primarily as a rejection of the criminal legal system. “Not calling the cops” becomes a litmus test for radical realness. Community Accountability processes are rarely convened to address late rent payments, someone driving drunk, stealing or other such harms. Instead, these processes have been applied almost exclusively to “gendered” violence: sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking, domestic violence. The mix of Community Accountability as a rejection of the criminal legal system and as a test of realness has at least two significant consequences: it creates the false idea that we can eliminate the harms of the criminal legal system through Community Accountability, and it requires women to bear the brunt of the Community Accountability learning curve."

Connie Burk, Think. Re-think: Accountable Communities. From The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence within Activist Communities (2011), ed. by Ching-In Chen, Jai Dulani, and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha.

(via quixotess)(via vladislava)

(Source: t-akver, via cellulitisplayerhater)

"My colleagues and I refer to this belief as ‘The Boiler Theory of Men.’ The idea is that a person can only tolerate so much accumulated pain and frustration. If it doesn’t get vented periodically—kind of like a pressure cooker—then there’s bound to be a serious accident. This myth has the ring of truth to it because we are all aware of how many men keep too much emotion pent up side. Since most abusers are male, it seems to add up.

But it doesn’t, and here’s why: Most of my clients are not usually repressed. In fact, many of them express their feelings more than some nonabusive men. Rather than trapping everything inside, they actually tend to do the opposite: They have an exaggerated idea of how important their feelings are, and they talk about their feelings—and act them out—all the time, until their partners and children are exhausted from hearing about it all. An abuser’s emotions are as likely to be too big as too small. They can fill up the whole house. When he feels bad, he thinks that life should stop for everyone else in the family until someone fixes his discomfort. His partner’s life crises, the children’s sicknesses, meals, birthdays—nothing else matters as much as his feelings.

It is not his feelings the abuser is too distant from; it is his partner’s feelings and his children’s feelings. Those are the emotions that he knows so little about and that he needs to ‘get in touch with.’ My job as an abuse counselor often involves steering the discussion away from how my clients feel and toward how they think (including their attitudes toward their partner’s feelings). My clients keep trying to drive the ball back into the court that is familiar and comfortable to them, where their inner world is the only thing that matters."

— Lundy Bancroft in Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002), pp. 30–31 (via mikroblogolas)

(via unobject)

"

Key points to remember:

  • Abuse grows from attitudes and values, not feelings. The roots are ownership, the trunk is entitlement, and the branches are control.
  • Abuse and respect are opposites. Abusers cannot change unless they overcome their core disrespect toward their partners.
  • Abusers are far more conscious of what they are doing than they appear to be. However, even their less-conscious behaviors are driven by their core attitudes.
  • Abusers are unwilling to be nonabusive, not unable. They do not want to give up power and control.
  • You are not crazy. Trust your perceptions of how your abusive partner treats you and thinks about you.
"

— Lundy Bancroft in Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002), p. 240 (via mikroblogolas)

"He exaggerates and overvalues his own contributions. If he was generous one day back in 1997, you are probably still hearing about it today as proof of how wonderfully he treats you and how ungrateful you are. He seems to keep a mental list of any favors or unkindnesses he ever does and expects each one paid back at a heavy interest rate. He thinks you owe him tremendous gratitude for meeting the ordinary responsibilities of daily life—when he does—but takes your contributions for granted."

— Lundy Bancroft in Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002), p. 78 (via mikroblogolas)

(via callmeoutbro)

Tags: abuse

"

[W]ith partner abuse, the periods when the man is being good—or at least not at his worst—are not really outside of his pattern. They are generally an integral aspect of his abusiveness, woven into the fabric of his thinking and behavior.

What functions do the good periods play? They perform several, including the following:

  • His spurts of kindness and generosity help him to feel good about himself. He can persuade himself that you are the one who is messed up, “because look at me, I’m a great guy.”
  • You gradually feel warmer and more trusting toward him. The good periods are critical to hooking you back into the relationship, especially if he doesn’t have another way to keep you from leaving, such as financial control or the threat of taking the children.
  • While you are feeling more trusting, you expose more of your true feelings about different issues in your life and you show him more caring, which creates vulnerability that he can use later to control you. […]
  • He uses the good periods to shape his public image, making it harder for you to get people to believe that he’s abusive.
"

Lundy Bancroft in Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002), pp. 150–51

"Good" periods also function to decrease a woman’s resolve to leave the abusive situation.

(via mikroblogolas)

(via pandorasprings)

Tags: abuse

I sometimes wish people would remember that denying someone’s emotional reality is one of the most damaging things you can do to them.

and-she-was-a-hurricane:

Trying to help them get through it is one thing, denying the validity of it is another.

(via internal-acceptance-movement)

"It is also impossible to persuade an abusive man to change by convincing him that he would benefit, because he perceives the benefits of controlling his partner as vastly outweighing the losses. This is part of why so many men initially take steps to change their abusive behavior but then return to their old ways. There is another reason why appealing to his self-interest doesn’t work: The abusive man’s belief that his own needs should come ahead of his partner’s is at the core of his problem. Therefore when anyone, including therapists, tells an abusive man that he should change because that’s what’s best for him, they are inadvertently feeding his selfish focus on himself: You can’t simultaneously contribute to a problem and solve it. Those abusive men who make lasting changes are the ones who do so because they realize how badly they are hurting their partners and children—in other words, because they learn to care about what is good for others in the family and develop empathy, instead of caring only about themselves."

Lundy Bancroft in Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002), p. 361

Also very relevant to attempts to sell feminism to men through claims of how great it will make men’s lives.

(via lonelyapron)

(Source: mikroblogolas, via partysoft)

survivorrat:

Abusive parent does anything for you.
"You owe me"
It doesn’t matter how big or how small I end up “owing” my parent for just acting like a parent. You don’t raise a child with a score board. You care for them because they’re you family and it’s the right, not to mention LAWFUL, thing to do. You don’t get to martyr yourself and you don’t get give yourself damn brownie points for not being as terrible as you could have been.
I’m tired of being guilted and shamed just because you didn’t leave me outside an orphanage.

survivorrat:

Abusive parent does anything for you.

"You owe me"

It doesn’t matter how big or how small I end up “owing” my parent for just acting like a parent. You don’t raise a child with a score board. You care for them because they’re you family and it’s the right, not to mention LAWFUL, thing to do. You don’t get to martyr yourself and you don’t get give yourself damn brownie points for not being as terrible as you could have been.

I’m tired of being guilted and shamed just because you didn’t leave me outside an orphanage.

(via marvelous-merbutler)